Archive for February, 2011

In Case You Missed It: 2-23-11

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Welcome back, gentle readers!  The Scavenger has missed terribly each and every one of you.  Unfortunately, his column was sabotaged several weeks running by Weather Gone Wild in his hometown of Chicago; possibly this occured because of some disparaging comments the Scavenger made at a Black History Month gala while standing within earshot of the Wakandan Queen.  No, not Vibraxas – Storm. 
Emergency-class snowfall wasn’t the only thing foisted on Chicago these past weeks: we have a new mayor, as well.  In Case You Missed It, former White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel is now the Mayor-Elect of Chicago.  The Scavenger desperately hopes that having Rahm as Mayor means that someone will finally do something about the Dire Wraith invasion that has plagued our city since the late 1970s. 
But enough about politics!  You came here for a queer-focused recap of the past week’s comics.  And what a week it was.  We had gay bromance; lesbian super-villainesses; roller-disco; hookups; men’s room meet-ups; and Hellcat, Hellcat, Hellcat!

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28

02 2011

THE GIRL CAN’T HELP IT!

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Taste like 90's slacker angst... which also taste like chicken!

 

i zombie.

u zombie.

We all zombie for BRAINS!

A zombie, a werewolf, and a vampire walk into a diner. The waitress asks:

“Is this an episode of BEING HUMAN?” (rimshot!)

 

No honey, it’s IZOMBIE! Vertigo’s latest response to pop culture! YAY!

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27

02 2011

Issue 139 – New Kids on the Block!

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This week, the new kids of CBQ (Joe, John, Saro, Tony and PattyBoom) take over the show and review comics comics comics! Take a listen, won’t ya?

 

26

02 2011

With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility (and Fashion Sense-HELLO!).

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I recently started playing DC Universe Online, the video game that features me, the fearless queer geek, running around the DC metro of my choice, building up my powers and coming face to face with a bevy of DC’s finest. But before I could zip away to save the world from Brainiac’s hordes I had to create a costume. CREATE A COSTUME. CREATE A COSTUME!?!

Holy shit, as a mode-loving gay, and a comic lover, what the hell am I supposed to do now?!? I’ve been asked to create the focused totality of my fashion prowess personified? And, let’s face it,  I didn’t have some Beyonder-provided machine to read my mind to fabricate my inner hero in a flash.

Would I be simplistic, and clad in retro-chic Legion palettes with crisp gloves, peaked shoulder pads, and stewardess primary color ranges? Would I go 90s loathsome-Leifield over the top mullet crazy with leather jackets, and every belt known to man? Or, perhaps try to create something between Kirby, Apocalyptian Realness and First-Family-Fantastic matchey-matchey, same-same. I wanted to look fabulous, love my character, and still play the game feeling like a gay geek with an individual stylish representation of moi. Can this happen? This is clearly a Crisis on Infinite Earths-scale problem.

This made my simple mind start to think (cue steam sound). What does it take to make a comic book character look memorable, and can it be interesting and fashion-forward, because as the notorious Emma Frost said, “We must be nothing less than fabulous.” And, this is Comic Book Queers, where we can demand such high levels of narcissism, and vanity.

Which brings us back to me, Chimaeraman, who will persevere as CBQ’s own Mr. Watcher-Blackwell and  monitor the perilous pages to bring you the answers to these questions and more.  I will de-code the mode from Attilan to Zamaron filtered through the eyes of an haute couture happy homo.  There will be good, there will be bad, and both hemlines and souls will be shredded with my Swarovski Soulsword. ( I don’t really have one, but one can dream.)

And yes, I’ll let you know how my DCUO character turned out….

First up, I thought I’d start by picking some of my all time favorites:

Hela-

How can you not love her various incarnations of vermillion Gaultier-esque straps and undead Showgirl splendor?!? Death never looked so beautiful and I totally know that she commissioned Phillip Treacy to create her headpiece – just sayin’.

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24

02 2011

The Queers Are Taking Over C2E2!

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It’s official….the Comic Book Queers will be hosting a panel at C2E2 next month! Come join in on the fun!

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22

02 2011

Dazzlered & Confused Episode 3 – with Pixie, Anole and Luke Cage – OH MY!

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Dazzler tries to increase her podcast cred by hiring a sound engineer and a news guy. So she’s enlisted X-Men, Pixie and Anole to help her out. February is black history month, and in an effort to make her podcast more diverse, she gets Luke Cage to come on as a guest. You’re not going to believe what happens next, but let’s just say that a certain hell dimension comes into play.
 

22

02 2011

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the X-Men (again)

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This past week we saw the stratospheric premiere of Lady Gaga’s new single, Born This Way, and the almost immediate comparison to Madonna’s 1989 anthem, Express Yourself. The Internet clamor about Express Yourself’s purported originality versus Born this Way’s derivativeness was surprising. Forget the fact that both the single and the performance at the Grammy’s were quite obviously nods at the Material Girl’s legacy; the Internet commenterati acted as if Madonna had been the first person to discover dance beats and musical expressions of self-awareness, and as if Madonna were not herself a collage of borrowed musical styles whitewashed and tamed for her predominantly white, middle class audience.

Madonna built a career borrowing from the New York gay, black and Latin communities, translating their musical and choreographic innovations for a majority straight, white, and suburban audience. Her minority aesthetic was delivered with a wink, clear to those in the know but submerged enough to pose no real threat to her target majority audience. Her status as a gay icon has always bothered me, particularly after her patronizing turn as fully-capable den mother to a group of “emotional cripples” (her words), her predominantly black and Latino gay dancers in Truth or Dare. It is especially  strange to me that she continues to have any feminist or progressive credentials after the horrors of her recent British turn, where she exsanguinated herself of the remaining shreds of her ethnic, Italian working-class roots and explicitly rejected her persona as a sexual dissident. Her transformation into everything against which she had claimed to rebel was complete.

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21

02 2011

A Hero is Hard to Find

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In memory of Perry Moore,  frequent guest of the show Randy Ham shares his thoughts on the author/producer’s passing:

I can’t lay claim to being Perry Moore’s friend. I didn’t know his favorite color, what his favorite film was, or what kind of music he liked. Even so, he touched my life and the lives of those around me in a positive way.

I read ‘Hero’ while I was a buyer for a book chain. As soon as I finished it, I sent a message through Perry’s site telling him how much I enjoyed the book, and how I wished that I had had a book like that growing up. Perry responded with a very kind and appreciative email. After that, we would exchange the odd, infrequent emails, usually about ‘Hero.’ He was trying to get it sold as a tv series, and always seem to be frustrated by the results. Knowing Stan Lee was on board, I just felt that this series would happen, sooner or later. I was also excited that Perry had mentioned in many interviews that Thom Creed’s story was not done.

A couple of years went by, and I met a young man who was very hesitant about coming out. I passed along his story to Perry and asked Perry if he would autograph a copy of the book for this young man. Perry agreed, and that set in motion more and more emails, culminating with an interview posted on my website and featured on the Comic Book Queers podcast. What I remember most was Perry’s generosity, kindness, and infectious enthusiasm for ‘Hero’ and all of the lives it touched. He was always moved by the stories of LGBT teens and our straight allies, who discovered the book, and through the book, got the courage to come out, and combat homophobia.

I gave my young friend a copy of ‘Hero’ and he has turned out to be an exceptional person, so comfortable with himself and proud of who he is. I think Perry had a little to do with that.

We lost Perry yesterday (02/17/2011), and my world has been turned upside down. I don’t know how to mourn for someone I knew purely in a cyber-context. I don’t know where the feelings of sadness for the author stop and the sadness for the man start. I do know that my heart goes out to his family, his partner Hunter Hill, his fans, and for the people who will never know him in any way. I mourn for Thom Creed, that his story will remain unfinished.

I celebrate the fact that he was in my life, if only briefly, and wirelessly. He brought a lot of joy to me, and helped me help someone in need. I hope that the Perry people remember, and the fact that he will live on in the pages of ‘Hero’ and in the land of Narnia.

Thank you Perry…

19

02 2011

Sex & The Superhero part 2

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We’re ready for part two of the SATS story! Remember, you can get your own copy of SATS right at SoSuperDuper.com!

Previously in Sex & The Superhero: The gang meet at their downtown headquarters and Pink Storm regails them with the story of how he fought then bedded his leather-punk-daddy-archvillain, Dark Devil.

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19

02 2011

In Case You Missed It (Mini)

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In case you missed him, the Scavenger will be posting full-sized articles again starting next week.  In the meantime, God Bless Kathryn Immonen:

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19

02 2011